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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
even south america. this is what people think is going to happen. how do you deal with that situation? well, it's not a coincidence that william walker support slavery. so it is to bring african slaves into these areas, some people are talking about how we should inflate central americans themselves. it is a strange and unusual situation. i think that filibustering was uneasy with the us-mexico war. but by no means does this stop americans from starting to get more territory. i think the seeming ease with which the u.s. took the territory embolden expansionist as they we have that much of mexico, sure, we can go to central america, no problem. at the very back? >> [inaudible question] >> okay. >> the first question has to do with the immigrants coming to the united states during the 1840s. they have an opinion or observation about the war, and how did this affect their integration into u.s. society? the second question is montgomery. and in her reporting effect this order this continue to fester the manifest destiny? >> okay, i write a lot about this, and i don't think that her report
the united states encompassing all of central america, canada and even south america. this is what people think is going to happen. how do we deal with that situation? it is not a coincidence that william walker supports slavery. his idea, to bring african-american slaves into the area, some people -- enslave central americans themselves. a strange and unusual situation but filibustering is very unusual ending u.s./mexico war. and the seeming ease with which the u.s. took half of mexico's territory emboldened expansionists to say to get that much of mexico we can get central america no problem. [inaudible] >> kind in -- first question is -- has to do with immigrants coming to the united states from the 1840s, did they have an opinion or observation about war, and the integration to u.s. society, the second question is core montgomerie and does reporting affect the national attitudes or does it continue to fester the idea of manifest destiny? >> i read a lot about that. some people are basically implicated -- to go a peace treaty but basically a lot of support for that -- i don't think cor
of south america. california was eager to go its own way. secession in other words was a tiger that might bite in any direction. andrew johnson of tennessee, great unionist southerner, put it this way. if there is one division of the state, will there not be more than one? wouldn't north america soon be just as fragmented and war prone as europe lacks 33 petty governments, a little aristocracy in common citizen not being able to pass from one state to another without a passport which would result in anarchy? johnson argued that dissolution of the union was quote only be the beginning of endless war. and so near the end of 1862, with his army stalled, his cabinet on the verge of revolt, abraham lincoln took most of the week to work on his annual message to congress. something that gets whitest as much attention in the first two-thirds consist of reports on the various departments of the governmengovernmen t. so you read it and you learn about how many post offices there were in the united states and how much money came into the government and how much one out but then when he gets to the e
the united states in compassing all of central america, canada, perhaps south america. this is what people think is going to happen. how do you do with the situation? it's not a coincidence that william walker supports slavery. his ideas to bring african slaves into these areas geared some people talk about perhaps we shouldn't say essential americans themselves. so it's a strange and unusual situation, the filibustering exist very uneasily with the u.s.-mexico war. but by no means at the close of the u.s.-mexican war stop people from territory. i think the ease or seeming ease with which the u.s. tech half of mexico's territory broadens expansionists to say it said was that easy to get that much of mexico, we can get central america no problem. at the very back. >> two questions are forming in my mind. [inaudible] first question has to do with the immigrants coming to the united states during the 1840s. did they have an opinion or observation about the war, and how did it affect their immigration to u.s. society? second question is core of montgomery research reporting affect the national
, nearly a third of the market will be north and south america. a third will be europe and russia and africa. and about a third of the market will be asia pacific. and in china's case, to your point, china now has replaced the united states as the largest auto market. the chinese veitremendous respe for history. they know about henry ford and lincoln. so we'll be bringing the first lincoln vehicles to china in 2014. >> alan mulally, ford president and ceo. thank you for coming on. we appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> now this. an infant left without her parents after an nfl player just snaps. and now as a city mourns, sportscaster bob costas goes off on gun control. i'm brooke baldwin. the news is now. >>> if syria's chemical weapons are on the move, who's watching them? and where do they end up? >>> plus, as eight more people die in chicago -- >> we walk through a front door that was wide open. you can see the equipment is here. this was defunded by the program because they couldn't figure out what they had done with the money. >> -- cnn investigates the program getting cash to st
to cut costs and automate operations to compete with aggressive rivals in canada and south america. that is pitting them against unions, which are struggling to reserve high-paying jobs for the middle-class members. it was resolved late tuesday, according to this article. here is the front page of the press." feet frefree state says detroit out of time to fix its fiscal mess. falling revenues and rising expenses. the state of michigan delivered an abrupt ultimatum to the city wednesday. move quickly toward reform, or an emergency financial manager will be reported. -- a ppointed. -- appointed. dana in california, republican. caller: i'm 56 years old. i live in california. i can give the perspective of what has happened in my state and the economy and all that stuff. back in 1982, i was making $8.50 an hour. but i have seen happen in my state and happening in more, not just illegal immigrants, but our children. i have watched my state do a nose dive. people cannot afford more things. i'm watching them destroy our social system, our schools. it is absolute insanity, but i see happeni
dell specifically focused on this issue this past summer to south america. we're all aware of the iranian threat or their proxies' activity here in this hemisphere. whether it's the thwarted assassination attempt last year where the operatives of the iranian revolutionary guard were trying to use mexican drug cartel connections to enter the united states, to assassinate the ambassador from saudi arabia , or we're aware of hezbollah recently being revealed that hezbollah had a terrorist training camp or a training camp of some origin in nicaragua, here in this hemisphere. last week the iranian deputy foreign minister for europe and the americas visited cuba, venezuela, bolivia and uruguay. this follows the iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad's frequent trips to the region. most recently iranian naval commanders have expressed their intent to extend iran's maritime presence into the atlantic ocean, closer to the coastlines of the u.s. with this piece of legislation, we seek to protect u.s. citizens from threats from iran and defend american interests and assets here in this
and infrastructure, including south east asia, south america, and west africa. we are pleased with the progress we are making. we will continue to take action so has the law recognizes its behavior is unacceptable and cannot blogger offering within communities at home and abroad. as we have seen, the world of counter-terrorism is changing fast. some of the most dangerous threats received it noticeably but new ones are emerging. these cannot be viewed with complacency. the political transformations in the middle east and north africa are having a profound effect on our form policy, including our counter-terrorism. aq was not a part of the popular uprising that led to democratic tensions since -- democratic transitions across the middle east and north africa. well never expected this to be a painless process, revolutionary transformations are dislocating and unpredictable by their nature. there are risks and we must seek to reduce them even as we work to help with these states in transition find long-term success. we need continued engagement and strategic patients. we need to work towards our long-
today in america. the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina. so the south now is almost entirely republican whereas justen 25 years ago it was pretty entirely democratic. it is not just the south. states like utah and idaho and others. >> what are they doing with that power? that's the interesting thing. >> so they have the power, and they are using it. you have states like kansas and florida that have been cutting taxes aggressively to promote jobs. you have a lot of the states in the mountain states that are republican and are aggressively promoting pro energyer drilling policies to get at the pir natural resources. and the big story you mentioned was what is happening with right to work. and it wasn't just michigan. sometimes we forget that earlier indiana was a right to work state too. so two midwestern states that are traditionally m heavy unionized moved to the right to work. i wouldn't be surprised if we see a couple more states fall. >> interesting i contrast in maryland and virginia. in virginian you have republican governor cutting taxes and cutting s
in european europe and hard in south africa and latin america but i think there is some hope that the dynamics can carry them through. >> the united states has to play an active leadership role rather than a passive leadership role. if the united states is passive and barack obama represents democratic ideas that it should be more passive this is the kind of world that results. i think places like egypt and even syria were looking to the united states to have a presence in this transition, but we have not seen the have and we're seen the results. >> paul: where is the potential of flash points? >> we don't talk about europe enough. the crisis in europe has not turned the corner. it's going to get dra mat kli worse. in portugal, spain, italy, there isening political dysfunction. that is going to encourage russia to make moves of its own. you mention south africa, south africa is not going in 'n a good direction. it was supposed to be the most optimistic spot. maybe new zealand but somebody told me they are heading south. >> paul: coming down to obamacare. big changes may be coming for 2013 for
. when i first became the leader, i took a trip with a number of senators to south america to countries that we american senators had never been to, like bolivia. it was a wonderful trip. it was great for our country and it was good for the senators to learn more about that most important part of the world. i was very fixed on who i wanted to go on that trip with me. but the two i asked to go was judd greg going, new hampshire, who had been chairman of the budget committee; and kent conrad, who was chairman of the budget committee at the time. those two fine senators spent about 18 hours seated side by side, both having tablets to write on and they were working on the number-one issue that they thought was important for this country: what we do about the future of this country economically. and they came up with an idea that was very, very good. it had worked before on closing military bases. madam president, we had military bases that we had been trying to close since world war 1. we couldn't do it. we didn't have the political will to do it. so we had a base-closing commission. with t
? i will talk about the bricks in a minute. i am talking about south america, eastern europe, parts of asia. why do i love this story? it is basic macroeconomics. the key ingredients that drive growth. we know the story of debt, deficit, fiscal cliff. we know that the story of the aging population and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50
that on the state level. there are 30 republican governors today in america, the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina so that south now is almost entirely republican, whereas just 25 years ago, it was pretty entirely democratic. and it's not just the south. states like-- >> what are they doing with that power, that's the interesting thing. >> so, they have the power and they are actually using it, af got states like kansas, and florida that have been cutting taxes aggressively to promote jobs. you've got a lot of the states in the mountain states that are republican, where they're aggressively promoting pro energy drilling policies to get at the national resources and of course, the big story that you mentioned, paul, is what's happening with right to work, it wasn't just michigan, sometimes we forget earlier indiana became a right to work state, too, so, two midwestern states that have traditionally been pretty heavily unionized moved to right to work and i wouldn't be surprised if next year we see a couple more states fall. >> interesting contrast in maryland and vi
of america hears the great things about south carolina. [applause] >> thank you, tim. to our conservative rock star for the state of south carolina and our conservative rock star for the country and the heritage foundation, center jim -- senator jim demint. >> governor, when you say there will never be anyone like me, most of washington says, thank goodness. [laughter] i am excited about what is going on today. one of the few things i am worried about what i was considering leaving the senate was who would replace me. i knew that governor haley would put someone in this seat that we would be proud of and continue to stand for those principles of freedom and opportunity. governor, thank you for your faithfulness to our cause and your good judgment. tim, i could not be happier today. i can walk away from the senate and knowing that someone is better than i am that will carry the voice of conservatism to the whole country in a way that i could not do. i will keep working with that cause, but you inspired me since i heard you speak in public. our country needs those positive and optimistic v
. we have a great group who truly understands we are here to represent the great state of south carolina and the citizens of america, and i thank them all for their friendship. finally, i'd like to thank all of my colleagues here in the house. we may not always agree on things, but we are here for a reason, to try and make this nation better. as i prepare to move to the united states senate, it is that belief that makes me incredibly optimistic about our future. the battles of today will in the future be seen as a positive turning point for our nation where we got our fiscal house back in order and revitalized the american dream for our children and our grandchildren. i look forward to continuing to serve the res. dents -- residents of south carolina, some of the most passionate people in our nation, and i will never forget my time here in the people's house where we worked every single day to build a brighter future for our nation. thank you. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 12-a of rule 1, the chair declares the house in recess until 10:00 a.m. you and also on our w
to build a new airport south of the metropolitan area of chicago. >> airports are the one thing we do in america that people get when it comes to the partnerships. there's always criticism of this, criticism that the governments don't have money, there are criticisms that governments don't make the rht decisions. the city of chicago famously struggled with its public/private partnership on its parking meters in 2008. the city leased its system to a group of private investigators. they did a poor job of managing the transition. there were steep rate hikes and confusion and it resulted in the downgrade of the city's credit rating. i know that's not one of your projects. >> no, that's right. >> what are the lessons of that type of thing for your own initiatives? >> you got to be very careful. you know, the city also did one with the skyway, a bridge across from chicago to indiana. that was done in a better fashion. if it's not carefully done, it can really backfire. so that's why we take each step and do it in a very reasonable sound way. we're embarking on this. this is brand new for ou
to my state of south dakota. while greater access to the russian market will benefit a wide range of u.s. companies such as manufacturers and service providers, i would be remiss not to point out the enormous opportunity for america's agricultural producers in russia. consider that russia is the world's largest importer of beef on a quantity basis, with imports of nearly $4 billion last year. russia is the fifth -- world's fifth largest importer of pork products as well as the largest importer of dairy products. despite the problems we've encountered recently with respect to to our poultry exports, america remains the largest supplier of poultry to the russian market accounting for 50% last year. under the terms of russia's w.t.o. aaccession in august, it is adhering to w.t.o. rules regarding sanitary and phytosanitary measures. once we've enacted pntr, the united states will have the ability to enforce these commitments through the world trade organization dispute settlement process. it's important to note that our vote on passage of this bill is different than voting on a trade agree
accident south 101 santa rosa four cars involved multiple lanes south 85 at south fremont accident having slow traffic there ♪ jingle bell, jingle bell >>> good morning, america. this morning, "gma" megaholiday "deals and steals", live from times square. ♪ >> wow. >> and our trumpeters this morning, for our megaholiday "deals and steals." d.j. ms. nix. robin, can you believe what you're missing this morning? you see, we have a big crowd upstairs. tory johnson, with lots of deals for everyone. we had a couple of flash ones this morning. >> whoa. >> and apparently, we have my fourth grade son on the camera. >> not only that. we have a crazy camera. and now, they're going to cue the sirens, too. >> all right. >> that siren means it's time to go to tory johnson for another flash deal. you've heard of flash mobs. we have flash deals. hey, tory. >> hey. this comes to you from one of your favorite brands. yankee candle is offering "gma" viewers 20% off their entire website. to get that discount, you have to get the code at goodmorningamerica.com on yahoo! lara? >> tory, thank you. that sound
led. he has been consistent and transparent. that is why there is no way to have another in america. thankfully we do not lose a jim demint. we saw him going to a bigger opportunity to influence america. i look forward to working with senator lindsey graham. there is no one else in south carolina. he understands foreign affairs are real. i look forward to learning more about foreign affairs. i will also say that over the last two years i've had the privilege of gaining a new family. we do not look alike but sometimes we do. everyone from joe wilson who we refer to as the scoutmaster and jeff duncan who is not here with us, i have been afforded the great opportunities in the world to serve in the house of representatives. what has made more meaningful is to have served with these four guys and our scoutmaster. i look forward to continue to build. i have not won anything yet in the senate. i have to run for reelection in 2014. i look for to the opportunity to introduce myself to citizens throughout this great state. the future is incredibly bright for america. we have our challenges.
in chicago health care in our lifetimes. sheila line was born and raised on the south side of chicago, one of three children of irish immigrants who met in america. she attended little flower elementary school. she joined the sisters of mercy in 1953. she earned her master's degree in psychiatric nursing from st. xavier college and an m.b.a. from the university of chicago and served three years as assistant professor at the university of iowa. in 1976 she became mercy hospital's president and c.e.o. in 1991 mayor richard m. daily daily -- daly appointed her health commissioner. the department's responsibilities ran the gamut from inspecting restaurants to monitoring and controlling epidemic and protecting the public against the spread of infectious disease. its clinics received a million patient vichts a year and served as a family doctor to more chicagoans than any other entity. h.i.v. and aids were taking a toll on the city and nation, gay and lesbian groups protested her appointment strongly, fearing she would allow catholic church policies to dictate public health decisions. sister she
in the south. i spoke to a soldier that just came back from korea. he said, i felt safer walking down the streets in korea then hear in america. this is a soldier that fought in the war. it is a shame. my point is this. with guns and in america -- we have too many guns and they cannot take the guns anywhere. will somebody please talk to the president and congress and the senate and tell them we need military soldiers in our schools. that will stop the gun thing. charlton heston should be turning over in his grave. my point is to the nation, please talk to congressmen and senators and put a military soldier that has been through military training and in the classroom every day. they can still break the windows and come in and should up the place with metal detectors. which have soldier so our kids can go to schools and be safe in the public schools. host: thank you for the call. on facebook a couple of items. this one from todd at. . back to the phones. william from ohio. caller: good morning. i am very saddened by what happened. i would like to offer a different perspective on this. i
increase on january 1. colleagues, republicans as well as democrats, sign now, the signal that america needs. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from michigan yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina seek recognition? without objection, the gentleman from south carolina is recognized for one minute. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, yesterday speaker boehner sent a letter to the president in response to his unreasonable proposal to how congress can avert the fiscal cliff. shortly after the election, the house republican leadership presented the president with a balanced framework of coupling spending come cutlers and reforms. it also states, quote, regrettably the proposal outlined on behalf of your administration contains very little in the way of common ground. the proposal calls for a $1.6 trillion in new tax revenue, twice the amount you supported during the campaign. end of quote. house republicans understand the necessity of finding a reasonable solution. we have made it very clear, we're willing to work with the senate leadership to find middle ground legi
the fiscal cliff is all about. it's about people. not politics. it's about protecting america's future. not repeating the mistakes of the past. with that, i'm proud to introduce my colleague, christi -- kristi noem from south dakota. >> good afternoon. thank all of you for coming. i was having a conversation with my 10-year-old son the other day, talking about lessons i had learn from my grandfather. my grandfather had always taught me that those people you are indebted to, they control you. they control your decisions, your opportunities, and what your future is going to be. right now, the amount of debt our children have sit ogen their heads that they're responsible for for the federal deficit is over $50,000 each. that's going to control them. that's going to control their futures and their decisions that they'll have available to them in the future. that's why the president's plan to raise taxes isn't a solution. because it only covered 8% of our federal deficit. it's not a solution that actually solves the problem that we have. we have got to have a solution that really addresses
this afternoon will be led by the gentleman from south carolina, mr. wilson. mr. wilson: everyone, including our guests in the gallery, please join in. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will now entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from south carolina rise? mr. wilson: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. wilson: mr. speaker, on sunday the president and house speaker boehner met to discuss the impending fiscal cliff. the next day the president jetted off to michigan to campaign for tax increases instead of staying in washington to work on a possible plan. with a national debt of over $16 trillion, washington's out-of-control spending is placing our national security at risk. clearly spending is a threat with an increase of 93.5% over 10 years and revenues increas
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)